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Global Claim Checks: Do Not Bend Your Clients
#145 30/01/2017 Geschätzte Lesezeit: 3 Minuten.

Advertising slogans and company claims can contain unwanted messages – especially when a foreign-language version has not been properly checked. A new service offers protection against the ‘omnishambles’ moment.

What do you do if what is written between the lines suddenly jumps out at you? Sometimes your customers discover messages that you had not intended to send, but there they are, on a giant billboard. Once someone has pointed it out, it is obvious to everybody, and there is no denying it.

You may have already guessed what I’m talking about: the ‘omnishambles’ moment. There are two ways of dealing with it, one being substantially cheaper than the other.

A quick reminder of the all-too-plausible incident in The Thick of It, the fictional series about top-level administrators in an unspecified UK government: Nicola Murray MP is on the campaign trail for fellow-politician Liam Bentley. Here she is, greeting the media in front of an election poster – or, more precisely, in front of the letters ‘L’ and ‘ley,’ leaving the viewer with the message: “IAM BENT.” Niola being all smiles, she seems to be very proud of this statement of hers.

Malcolm Tucker, swearer-in-chief and arch-nemesis of mediocrity and pusillanimity, has a go at her, culminating in what has become his most iconic verdict: that the situation is an ‘omnishambles.’


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The situation is awkward, and the take-home message for marketing professionals is clear: don’t just make sure you get words and phrases right, but look at how letter combinations spell out something you’d rather not see associated with your client’s product or service.

While this may be relatively easy to do in your home market, checking foreign-language versions of your claim is trickier. Linguistic, cultural, and visual aspects all have to be considered. And looking up various letter combinations in a foreign dictionary or on Google will deliver patchy results at best.

And what you cannot do for a foreign language is ascertain which additional letters will spoil your message. An English “To Let” sign only needs one letter (i) to turn it into something misleading, and you’ll definitely catch this one (or not be worried about it). Tons more examples can be found here. We recommend being similarly attentive across all the languages you work in.

Our solution is to offer cross-language spell and sound checks for your slogans. This can be combined with our transcreation services, or booked separately. For 65 languages across the world.

Being ouch!

I mean, Be in touch!

For more information and to discuss your project, contact Christophe Fricker, Managing Partner, at our UK offices and at cf@nimirum.info.

Image source: http://www.gagbay.com/gag/funny_sign_fail_dunkin_donuts-561661/

Wir empfehlen Ihnen folgende Zitierweise:
Fricker, Christophe: „Global Claim Checks: Do Not Bend Your Clients”, unter: https://www.nimirum.info/insights/b_145-global-claim-checks-do-not-bend-your-clients/ (abgerufen am 7/12/2018).

Your Contact


Christophe Fricker

Dr. Christophe Fricker

Managing Partner

Dr. Christophe Fricker puts research in touch with industry – and vice versa! At NIMIRUM, he creates structures for collaborative research. Staying in touch with a variety of research funder is an important part of his work. As NIMIRUM’s managing partner, he enjoys his daily work of providing companies with the knowledge they need, in coordination with his team of experts. Christophe received his doctorate at the University of Oxford. He taught and conducted research for four years at Duke University, and for two years at the University of Bristol. Today, he is responsible for NIMIRUM’s expert profile and the shape and substance of many research projects.

Contact Christophe Fricker

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